Tags

, , , , , ,

I’ve often wondered where the logic of the fear of sex comes from.  Clearly our society has become desensitized to violence enough to deem it a normal part of our everyday lives.

Have you ever noticed how movies that have “graphic” sexual acts go through a very rigorous process of rating and if there is too much of it, the threat of the doomed “X” rating presents itself?  Now, on the other hand, throw a movie on the big screen of someone lopping off body parts, torturing innocent people, or duplicating acts of terrorism that end up with large quantities of mutilated bodies, and it’s an “R” rating due to “graphic” violence.   At what point did society shift in such a way that the fear of exhibiting the natural joining of human bodies make it a dirty and depraved action?  Is sex really such a bad thing between consenting adults?  Is the passion that creates the bonding of two people really something that apparently indicates humanity has gone down the crapper?

Here’s where I get really confused.  Critics that have issues with the exploitation of women poo poo movies that have “graphic” sexual content.  They have determined that showing a viewing audience the natural act of coitus demeans women and villainizes men.  How interesting is it that when men play a part in determining what is fit for viewing, they have no issue with a lesbian scene but totally take off of the table the same act between two men?  Double standard much?  Ironically when it comes to hacking up the human body, it doesn’t matter what sex or color the actors are because “that’s entertainment.”

My next question is, what is deemed, “graphic?”  Penetration, oral interaction, role playing?  When rating a movie where extreme or “graphic” violence is being perpetrated on a woman, it’s called educational. You know, people need to see what victims of such horrendous things go through so we can be aware.  On some levels I agree, but then there is the gratuitous violence that has nothing to do with a lesson and just has to do with box office revenue and the shock factor. On the flip side, I can honestly say, I have never walked out of a theater and said, “damn, I hated that love scene between those two characters.  It makes me feel demeaned.”   I also don’t believe that men walk out of the theater and say, “damn, I got turned on by  that love scene between those two characters. It makes me want to rape somebody.”

Believe it or not, those archaic thought processes go through the minds of the powers that determine what we should or shouldn’t watch and how we are likely to receive it.  So “they” see us as mindless sheep that can’t think for ourselves and will be influenced to kill after watching violent movies or rape after watching sex in movies.  I could write volumes on perpetrators of these acts and clearly  bring across the point that watching movies had nothing to do with what is going on in our world today.

Did Iraq and Afghanistan come about because our government officials watched “Full Metal Jacket?”  Has female genital mutilation come about because a repressive male culture watched “9 1/2 Weeks?”

Get a grip.  What is in the human mind is there either by choice or because of biology.  Unfortunately we are also a society that finds it easy to cast blame rather than take responsibility.

That is all.

Advertisements